Should teachers and principals have to wear uniforms or have a dress code?!

WHY?

  • One of the most positive aspects of school uniform statistics is that in many states all across the US, significant drop has been registered in cases of teenage violence, sex offenses, vandalism incidents, school terminations and other similar problems with not only students, but the teachers as well.
  • While teachers wearing such uniforms is less common, there are clear advantages for teachers who wear uniforms including a connection with their students, practicality, and security.

Know the facts!

  • Students in Kenya, for example, were given uniforms along with their teachers. Test scores increased significantly along with attendance, which increased by 7%.
  • The unified school district in Long Beach, CA, one of the first public school districts in the U.S. to adopt a uniform policy in 1994, saw an 86% decrease in the overall crime rate at the school and a 90% decrease in suspensions only 4 years after adopting the policy.

Imagine…

  • School wide uniforms for teachers and students will make the children comfortable and more open to talking to their teachers because not only are they dressed similar, but it eliminates the concept of economic status, or how much money you make based on of clothing you wear.
  • If everyone dressed the same, including teachers, there would be less sex offenses, school terminations other similar problems that have to do with relationships.
  • With school uniforms for everyone, strangers will be easy to detect and it would help keep everyone safer so the students can graduate and begin their own lives, rather than risking them because an adult shows up on campus but goes unnoticed because they look like all the teachers.

We need to…

…give out school uniforms to everyone, including students, teachers, and administration. School colors are appropriate, but other basic, solid colors would work as well.

…be extremely strict with the uniform/code. If it isn’t enforced, no one will follow it, making school harder for everyone.

…and most importantly, make it affordable for families and teachers. With such low salaries, teachers, along with their students, need to be able to easily afford the uniforms required by the school.

Should Teachers Have To Wear Uniforms or Have Dress Codes?

Imagine that a class is sitting at their desks waiting for their class to begin when their teacher walks in wearing old sweatpants and a stained tank-top. Would you imagine that those students would listen to the teacher or take the teacher seriously?

Teachers should be required to have a dress code at school. The dress code should consist of dress pants that do not have holes in them. Also, an appropriate top that isn’t too low and doesn’t have any inappropriate words or signs on it. The dress code should consist of dresses or skirts but they have to end just above the knee, no shorter. Teachers do have a hard and tiring job so they do deserve some comfortability and because of that on Fridays, teachers can wear jeans. Although, the jeans shouldn’t have a ton of rips and holes in them. What can dress pants and a stainless shirt do?

If a teacher does not have authority of their classroom, it is likely that things will not get done and the students will not listen or learn anything. If a teacher is dressed like a student, a student will treat the teacher like one. Vice versa, if a teacher is dressed like a grown up or an authority figure, a student will treat them like one. A student is more likely to listen to a teacher who is wearing a professional-like outfit than a teacher who is dressed sloppy. Also, if students see a teacher dressed professionally they will assume the teacher will take their job seriously, correct papers, and have strict discipline. Why is it so important to have a dress code or to dress professionally?

Like most other jobs, you have to dress professionally during work hours. Statistics say that 93% of executives believe that an employee’s style of dress at work influences his or her chances of promotion. The most jobs that require a professional attire are ones that deal with people throughout their work day. If one is dressed business-like, one could assume that they take their job seriously. It is also said that dressing nice for work can boost your self-confidence level. If one dresses clean, neat, and professional, it shows that one takes pride in himself/herself and their position. Also, when most people get home they change into comfortable clothes to sit around and do nothing. The way you dress affects the way you think, look, and act. When you dress down, one will feel down and most likely not be productive and vice versa.

In conclusion, teachers should have a dress code. Although, they should have a casual day once a week. Having a dress code will increase a student’s listening and obedience because students will look at them as an authority figure. The dress code should consist of dress pants and a nice shirt. Also, dressing professional has a lot of positive effects, including, higher confidence level, better work performance, and respect. Teachers should have a dress code, what do you think?

The Advantages of a Four Day School Week

  1. The financial savings to districts that jump on the four-days-per-week bandwagon can be tremendous, regardless of the size of the district.
  2. Compacting school into just four days a week leaves more time for kids to spend with family, friends and outside interests.
  3. Most states allow districts to opt into a four-day week, either through flexible requirements, explicit administrative rules, or a waiver approval process.
  4. Four-day school week provides an opportunity for extra rest and a less stressful environment.
  5. Teachers have more time to prepare lessons and collaborate during the day.
  6. Allows students to relax or to be more productive.
  7. Proponents of four-day school weeks say that even though cost savings are minimal, they are achieved.
  8. Looking forward to a three-day weekend each week leads to greater work-life balance for teachers, which leads to improved staff morale and a positive impact on what is taught in classrooms.
  9. Opportunities for an extra work day at an after-school job, engaging in volunteer activities or pursuing additional educational goals.
  10. Anecdotal evidence also suggests that attendance improves; parents and teachers can schedule doctor’s appointments and other weekday commitments for Fridays rather than during school days.
  11. Kids said they enjoyed having more time for play, rest and even homework, while high schoolers tended to pick up extra shifts at their part-time jobs, or volunteer to boost their college prospects.
  12. Students who are athletes don’t miss as much class and have less work to make up when events occur on a day off.
  13. 4-day week for schooling is that it offers teachers and students an additional day for rest every week.
  14. District administrators also claim that the appeal of a four-day work week helps recruit teachers in areas where it is consistently difficult to attract new staff.
  15. More rest then equates to dealing with less stress over the course of a school year.
  16. Fewer days spent in class might mean fewer discipline referrals for students.
  17. Students feel less pressure because they have more time to study at their own pace at home, especially in the later grades.
  18. Students are more rested and focused and therefore less likely to disrupt class, be off task or engage in other behaviors requiring discipline.
  19. There were also reduced sick days requested by their teaching staff.
  20. Attendance has improved for teachers and students.
  21. Their graduation rates slowly increased year after year when they switched to a 4-day school week.
  22. An increase in academic achievement also has been associated with a four-day school week.
  23. Reported that their test scores improved when they shifted to this alternative schedule as well.
  24. Gradual increase in its graduation rate since adopting the new school week.
  25. There are potential reductions in the financial costs of running a school district.
  26. A reduction in system spending may be a significant factor considered when moving to a four-day school week.
  27. There is the potential of reducing transportation costs by up to 20% by shifting the schedule.
  28. Better teacher and student morale.
  29. Reduced discipline referral frequency.
  30. Transportation costs including fuel, bus maintenance and driver salaries are reduced.
  31. For school districts struggling with funding issues, the potential savings here could save the budget.
  32. If facilities are used only four days per week instead of five, there is a significant reduction in utility costs to the system.
  33. Staff recruitment is easier with the 4-day school week for school districts.
  34. Money spent to fund school breakfast and lunch programs are reduced by 20 percent, as is spending associated with all hourly cafeteria and custodial workers.
  35. The school districts in the state have stable student achievement levels on their standardized tests.

4-Day School Weeks—25 States Are Testing … Will Yours Be Next?

Shortening the school week to four days has become an increasingly common trend over the last decade. More and more school districts across the U.S. are embracing the four-day school week.

Once a district has taken this step, it is unlikely to return – voluntarily at least – to a five-day week. Best available research indicates that approximately 560 districts in 25 states have one or more schools on a four-day schedule. More than half of these districts are located in four states—Colorado, Montana, Oklahoma and Oregon—where a significant portion of districts have opted into the four-day week. The number of districts moving to a four-day week has grown dramatically, from approximately 120 in 21 states to 560 in 25 states.

Chopping Friday (or Monday) off the school schedule seems like a drastic step, so why are so many districts taking it? First and foremost, it’s seen as a necessary cost-saving measure, although few districts expect a windfall.  According to to the National Commission of State Legislatures (NCSL), on average, savings ranges from 0.4 percent to 2.5 percent of a district’s overall budget.

Most four-day week schools operate Monday through Thursday, with a few opting for Tuesday through Friday. School days are lengthened to deliver the same amount of instructional time over fewer days, as required by state law. Some schools may offer optional enrichment activities, tutoring, or schedule time for teacher development during the fifth day.

The four-day week is freeing up more time for our teachers to help them professionally, and that’s going to help our students. Students who wish to participate in after school sports and clubs may have fewer opportunities, especially if other schools in their district operate on different hours.

Proponents claim a four-day work week helps attract and retain quality teachers.

Teachers are in the building an hour longer than the students at the secondary level and 90 minutes more at the elementary level. The days may be longer, but they provide educators with more time for collaboration and planning, embedding professional development into the school schedule.

Looking forward to a three-day weekend each week leads to greater work-life balance for teachers, which leads to improved staff morale and a positive impact on what is taught in classrooms.

Compacting school into just four days a week leaves more time for kids to spend with family, friends and outside interests. Older students can spend time engaging in resumé-building public service or paid work. Teachers have more time to prepare lessons and collaborate during the day.

The benefits of going to a 4-day week for schooling is that it offers teachers and students an additional day for rest every week. More rest then equates to dealing with less stress over the course of a school year. Students feel less pressure because they have more time to study at their own pace at home, especially in the later grades.

Shifting to this schedule does have certain disadvantages, especially for working parents. For the parents of younger students, an additional full day of daycare may need to be scheduled every week instead of a partial day. This leads to added costs that some families, living paycheck to paycheck, may not be able to afford.

While kids and teachers relished the regular long weekends, parents did not. Those with younger kids worried about child care, and those with older children worried about the unstructured free time.

As four-day school weeks have proliferated, some experts are concerned that not enough is known about the impact on students and their families.

If four-day weeks begins to gain traction in more urban districts, experts fear low-income families could bear the brunt of a change that is otherwise quite popular with educators and others in the community. Shortened weeks present child care challenges and makes it more difficult for many students to get nutritious meals.

Kids said they enjoyed having more time for play, rest and even homework, while high schoolers tended to pick up extra shifts at their part-time jobs, or volunteer to boost their college prospects.

When it comes to academic outcomes, the jury is still out.

Opinions differ when it comes to measuring student achievement in the context of the four-day school week. Time and more research are needed to determine whether the change leads to positive or negative results.

Future of the Four-Day Week. There is not yet a complete picture of how four-day school weeks impact students and their families, but it is clear that more districts are adopting the schedule each year. While these districts are primarily smaller and rural, a few notable exceptions have raised questions about the possibility of more urban districts moving toward a four-day week.